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Historic Preservation

The Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies offers a certificate in Historic Preservation.   See the Certificate Program page for more details.

COURSES OFFERED

Archaeology in Historic Preservation

Architectural Paint Analysis

Architectural Stone Repair and Restoration

Historic Interior Plaster: Restoration and Preservation

Historic House Museums: Maintenance and Energy Efficiency

Historic Masonry Restoration

Historic Window Restoration

Integrated Pest Management

Preservation of Gravestones and Cemetery Monuments II- 

   Advanced Techniques


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Archaeology in Historic Preservation

Instructor: Peter Peregrine

Date: Offered again in 2015

Archaeologists are not often integrated into historic preservation teams, and archaeology itself is all too often seen as an “extra” in historic preservation efforts, only undertaken if it is required by law or if archaeological deposits are already known to exist.  This course provides an introduction to archaeology that demonstrates the kinds of information archaeologists can bring to an historic preservation project, the value of having an archaeologist on an historic preservation team, and the time and money that can be saved by integrating archaeological research into an historic preservation project from the start.  The course will involve lectures, discussions of students’ current or recent projects, hands-on work with archaeological objects, and visits to nearby archaeological sites. 

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Architectural Paint Analysis
Instructor: David Arbogast

Date: Offered again in 2015

The analysis of architectural paints and finishes, as opposed to those used in the field of fine art, is rapidly developing from its infancy where paint was scraped on site to the present where scientific analysis is being undertaken not only to determine historic colors, but also to determine other aspects of finishes such as composition and application methods.  David Arbogast, an architectural conservator with over thirty years of experience in the area of historic architectural paint analysis, will provide hands-on instruction in the microscopic analysis of historic architectural paints and other finishes.


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Architectural Stone Repair and Preservation

Instructor: John Lambert

Date: Offered again in 2015

This course provides you with state-of-the- art strategies, materials and techniques for intelligently repairing deteriorated or damaged architectural stone.  Learn when, why and how to choose between various repair options such as composite mortar patching, dutchman repairs, re-profiling, partial stone replacement, consolidation treatments, breathable water repellents and more.

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Historic Masonry Restoration
Instructor: John Lambert

Date: May 1-3, 2014

Cost: $975

Increase your understanding how historic masonry buildings were originally built and designed to function.  Explore the causes of deterioration and how to best prevent them.  Learn the best practices for repointing mortar joints, stripping paint, cleaning masonry, repairing cracks and crafting repairs that both visually match and perform well.  Understand how to insure compatibility between new repair materials and the original masonry.

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Historic Window Restoration
Instructor: Bob Yapp

Date: 2014 date TBD

Cost:

In our constant struggle to preserve original materials in historic homes, buildings and museum properties, original wood windows present one of our biggest challenges. The pressure to replace is backed up by multi-million dollar advertising campaigns perpetrated by the replacement industry. In the preservation movement's effort to lead the "Green Movement", we must constantly show the world that nothing is greener than an original window or existing property.

This course is an intense three- day, hands-on workshop that deals with these very issues. Students will learn by doing as they work side-by-side with instructor Bob Yapp. Every aspect of efficient and cost effective wood window restoration will be addressed. Students will work in teams. Each team will completely restore two double hung wood window openings including: sash removal; safe lead paint & putty removal; historic glass retention; painting; glazing putty installation; weather-stripping; re-installation of the sashes including how to re-string sash weights.

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Historic Interior Plaster: Restoration and Preservation
Instructor: Tim Stohl

Date: September 24-27, 2014

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee: $1050

This course will focus on flat plaster, plaster cornice, and decorative plaster ornaments.

Course topics include: a review of historic plaster and its evolution; plaster materials and their physical properties; causes of plaster deterioration; preservation of plaster; repairing flat plaster and plaster cornices; and the replication of decorative ornaments. Course participants will learn primarily through hands-on practice. Projects in which participants are currently involved will also be discussed.

Each participant should bring a CD or photographs illustrating plaster problems encountered in an actual building project.

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Historic House Museums: Maintenance and Energy Efficiency

Instructor:  Bob Yapp

Date: September 24-27, 2014

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee:  $815

This will be a fun and intense workshop. It is designed for those responsible for the ongoing care of historic house museums. Instructor Bob Yapp will lead this 3 day workshop in accordance with the Secretary of the Interiors Standards. This class is a combination of classroom and hands-on training. Student will learn the basic principles including:

Maintenance expectations for museum houses by the National Park Service

  • How to passively restore wooden floors
  • How to repair damaged and rotted wood
  • How to carefully weatherize house museums
  • Basic masonry repairs
  • Basic wood window repair
  • Basic window & door weatherization
  • Methods & materials for house museums

 

Since there is a hands-on element to the course, students should expect to get dirty. All tools and materials will be provided. 

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Introduction to Historic Preservation Theory
Instructor: David Arbogast

Next Date TBD

Rare is the architect or firm that does not encounter a project in historic preservation and rare is the architect or firm that has the experience and expertise to understand the intricacies of these projects and their clientele.  David Arbogast, an architectural conservator with over thirty years of experience in the field, will walk you through the common aspects of these projects ranging from the governmental agencies and regulations which frequently determine the outcome of the project to typical clientele to working with various preservation consultants.

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Log Cabin Repair and Restoration
Instructor: Joe Gallagher

Session I

Date:  NEW DATE! April 14-18 , 2014

Location: Historic Arkansas Museum, Little Rock Arkansas

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee: $450

Session II

Date: April 7-11, 2014

Location:  Lewis and Clark State Historic Site, Hartford, IL

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee: $500

Session III

Date: October 13-17, 2014

Location: Dallas Heritage Village, Dallas, TX

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee: $500

This workshop teaches participants to investigate and understand log structure problems by investigating deterioration problems in actual log buildings. It will teach participants how to understand and repair decay and deterioration in a log cabin. The class will consist of 2-3 hours of daily lectures covering cabin decay and deterioration issues and 3-4 hours a day repairing a log cabin. 

Lecture topics consist of:   Decay and deterioration causes; Installing logs and making

notches; appropriate finishes/coatings for log buildings; daubing dos and don’ts; getting it right; checks, cracks and other log maintenance issues; and foundations, roofs, moisture and the big picture.

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Methods and Materials for Maintenance of Historic Buildings

Instructors: Bob Yapp and John Leeke

This course has been developed in cooperation with The National Park Service Training Center in Fredrick, Maryland.

This course is designed for people who maintain historic properties. John Leeke and Bob Yapp, two of America's top hands-on, historic preservation and maintenance professionals will be teaching the course.

This is not a theory or planning course. John and Bob will be demonstrating actual materials and methods used to maintain historic properties of all varieties. You will learn how to identify the underlying conditions that create maintenance problems as well as the proper use of products and methods that have been tested in the field.

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Overview of American Architectural Styles

Instructor: Patricia Eckhardt

Next Date TBD

Women’s fashions, cars, furniture, and architecture, to name only a few examples, exhibit an evolution of styles over time. Th is course examines the progression of styles in American architecture. Style characteristics will be illustrated and discussed in a slide-lecture format. The technique of stylistic comparison used in the study of the visual arts will be employed in class. Questions and discussion will be encouraged. Field work in Mt. Carroll will allow students to become familiar with the characteristics of individual styles and to practice applying their style knowledge to individual buildings. Knowledge of architecture styles is not an end in itself. Its primary use in the fi eld of Historic Preservation is to determine a building’s date and to give it a style classifi cation. Style is a tool that gives us a glimpse into our cultural history. The course examines questions such as: “what is period style?,” why are there revivals of previous styles?,” “are there moral attitudes associated with styles?” and other questions. Along the way it is hoped that students will sharpen their powers of observation and analysis.

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Passive Wood Floor Restoration and Repair

Instructor:  Bob Yapp

This is an intense, four day, hands-on, learn-by-doing opportunity. This class is not about aggressively drum sanding wood floors so they look new. Much like fine antiques we want to keep the character defining features and patina of the flooring.

 You will be working side-by-side with instructor Bob Yapp restoring an oak, tongue and grooved floor in a building at The Campbell Center. Students will learn how to patch bad areas so they don’t look patched, passively remove the damaged old finish, remove water and pet stains as well as how to apply a finish.  

At the end of the four days students will know from beginning to end, how to repair & passively restore any hardwood or softwood tongue & grooved strip floor. Students of all skill levels are encouraged to enroll. Bring work clothes, knee pads and safety glasses.

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Preservation of Gravestones and Cemetery Monuments I: Basic
Instructor: Jon Appell

Date: May 12-14, 2014

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee: $875

The primary goal of this workshop is to educate the attendees regarding all of the various aspects of gravestone, monument, and historic masonry preservation.

The majority of the workshop will be conducted at a local historical cemetery.Classroom instruction will complement the hands-on training. The workshop will begin with a walk and talk tour, using the cemetery as an open -air museum to illustrate; basic geology, common preservation problems, previously failed repairs, and assorted other related issues. Gravestones and monuments, will then be selected to be repaired, cleaned or preserved in some manner, which represent most of the commonly encountered preservation problems, found in historic graveyards. 

The following list of preservation treatments will be performed during the during of the workshop, as well as other assorted procedures: 

We will perform the re-setting of a tablet-stone, which may be in a badly leaning, and or sunken condition. 

The repair of a broken gravestone will be conducted, by joining together the fractured stone fragments employing stone epoxy.

 The re-construction of fallen and or badly leaning multiple piece cemetery monument will be demonstrated, with a discussion on the historical use, and option to employ blind pinning.  

The use of historic pointing mortars and composite patching material will be overviewed and demonstrated, with an emphasis on the need for mortars which are compatible with the historic substrate they are being applied to. 

The process and potential need for consolidation of weak and decayed stone will be overviewed.

The issues and problems associated with sealing stone will be discussed in detail. 

An in depth demonstration on stone cleaning will be conducted, and performed by the participants. 

Cleaning is not something that should be indiscriminately performed, as some stone is too weak or fragile and may be harmed; many cleaning agents and chemicals can be detrimental to historic stone. Therefore the philosophy of cleaning will be discussed, and safe cleaning techniques will be demonstrated on gravestones which will benefit from the cleaning treatments.

 A folder containing printed information will be provided to further educate and inform students, regarding the conservation treatments and materials employed throughout the workshop.  Questions, interaction and group discussion is encouraged

.Participants are welcome to bring along photographs of historic masonry, sculptures,

or gravestones which they have concerns or questions regarding.

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Preservation of Gravestones and Cemetery Monuments II: Advanced       Techniques
Instructor: Jon Appell

Date: May 15-16, 2014

Cost: Tuition and Materials Fee: $600

This advanced workshop will be a continuation of the basic gravestone preservation workshop.It will cover more complex gravestone and monument conservation treatments and procedures.

The following techniques will be performed during the workshop as a group interactive experience:

A basic overhead stone lifting tripod will be constructed and employed to raise large fallen and or badly leaning monumental elements which are too heavy to lift by hand.

The rigging of stone in order to be lifted will be demonstrated.

The joining and setting of monuments will be performed.

Composite stone in-fill materials will be discussed in depth, and applied to various kinds of substrate. 

Pigments will be added to modify and create a color matching in-fill mortar.

Injection grout will be used to in-fill small cracks and voids, and help prevent freeze- thaw damage.

A replacement base will be cast out of concrete, in order to repair a gravestone fractured at or below the ground surface. After the concrete has cured, the tablet stone will be re-set into a socket base employing a historic pointing mortar.

Cleaning techniques will be covered in greater detail including the application of stone poultice to remove in ground staining.

The consolidation of a marble gravestone will be performed to strengthen the stone, and help prevent future degradation.

Additional preservation treatments will be discussed and performed based on the time allowance.

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Preservation Maintenance

Instructor: David Arbogast

Next Date TBD

Although the field of historic preservation seems to be dominated by spasmodic restorations of buildings, the hard work consists of the regular, routine maintenance of these resources.  This course has been developed to address those needs both in the short-term and in the long-term cycles.  It is intended both for those actively engaged in maintenance and for those responsible for the management of the resources.

The instructor, David Arbogast, is an architectural conservator with over thirty years of experience in the field.  He brings to the course a wealth of experience and knowledge both from the professional and from the occupational maintenance of historic resources.

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Understanding Historic Masonry Mortars
Instructor: John Lambert

Date: Offered Next in 2015

Designed to eliminate confusion & increase your understanding of both historic mortar aggregates and unique binders such as lime putty, natural cement, pozzolans, hydraulic lime, Portland cement and hydrated lime.  Understand when, where and why various mortars were used historically.  Learn to intelligently choose and correctly use these materials in today’s repointing mortars.


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Writing Historic Structures Reports

Instructor: David Arbogast

Next Date TBD

Without a doubt the most essential and, unfortunately, the most neglected investigation document used in the preservation of historic structures is the Historic Structure Report.  A well-written HSR provides the necessary data for not only significant intervention in a historic structure, but for the on-going curatorial care of the structure. Historic structures can be viewed as very large, highly complex artifacts requiring highly skilled care.  This course is designed for those given the responsibility both for the commissioning and for the preparation of Historic Structures Reports.  It examines all aspects and sections of the Historic Structures Reports, using available HSRs as examples to examine and dissect so that a new level of excellent will be achieved in the writing of these vital documents.

The instructor, David Arbogast, is an architectural conservator with over thirty years of experience in the field.  His book, How to Write a Historic Structures Report, has recently been published and will be used as the text for the course.

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