campbell center building

Instructors

Gary Albright Photographic Conservator, Private Practice, Honeoye, NY
Jon Appell Gravestone Conservator, Private Practice, West Hartford, CT
David Arbogast Architectural Conservator, Davenport, IA
Hubert Baija Senior Conservator, Rijksmuseum Paintings Department, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Barbara Becker Exhibit Development and Research, Becker Exhibit Planning, Chicago, IL
Sharon Bennett Project Archivist,College of Charleston, Charleston, SC
James Bernstein Painting Conservator, Private Practice, San Francisco, CA
Cynthia Kuniej Berry Painting Conservator, Private Practice, Chicago, IL
Terry Birkett Director of Collections, Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit, MI
Ryan Boatright Contemporary Artist/Photographer; former research scientist and the Image Permance Institute, Rocherster, NY.
Luke Boehnke Part time instructor in the Sculpture department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago; full time art rigger at Methods and Materials
Camille Myers Breeze Textile Conservator and Owner of Museum Textile Services, Andover, MA
Dan Brinkmeier Director of International CommunityOutreach, Field Museum, Chicago, IL
William Budde Project Archivist, Bennington Museum, Bennington, VT
Christine Conniff-O’Shea Assistant Conservator , The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Christa Deacy-Quinn

Collections Manager, Spurlock Museum, Urbana, IL

Patricia Eckhardt PhD, Architectural Historian, Iowa City, IA
Betsy Palmer Eldridge Book Conservator, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Linda Eppich Archivist/Grant Writer, Narragansett, RI
Hal Erickson Bioinformaticist, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT; and consulting conservation scientist/materials chemist, private practice, Cora, WY
Debra Evans Book and Paper, Photographic Materials Conservator, San Francisco, CA
Julia Fenn Objects Conservator, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Pam Gaible Mount Shop Supervisor, Field Museum, Chicago, IL
Joe Gallagher Owner, Heritage Preservation Resources, Inc., Ogden UT
Michele Greenan Director of Archaeology, Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites (ISMHS), Indianapolis, IN
Josh Hickman Digital Resources Librarian at Beloit College, Beloit, WI
Nathan Keay Photographer, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL
Mary Jablonski Architectural Conservator, Jablonski Conservation, Inc. New York, NY
Hilary A. Kaplan Training Specialist, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C.
David Kennedy Curator of Collections of the Cherokee Strip Regional
Heritage Center in Enid, OK
Gaby Kienitz Head Conservator, Indiana State Museum, Indianapolis, IN
John Lambert Masonry Restoration Consultant, Salt Lake City, UT
Dean Langworthy Foreman and Rigging Specialist, Methods and Materials, Chicago, IL
Gary J. Laughlin President, Senior Researcher and Instructor, McCrone Research Institute, Chicago, IL
John Leeke Historic Building Specialist, Owner of Historic HomeWorks
Earl Lock Exhibits Fabricator/Mountmaker, Chicago, IL
Peg McNamara Associate in Anthropology and Zoology, and Official Artist in Residence, Field Museum, Chicago; Faculty, Visual Communication Department, The School of the Art Institute, Chicago
William Maher University Archivist and Professor of Library Administration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Harold Mailand Textile Conservation Services, Indianapolis, IN
Susan Maltby Objects Conservator, Private Practice, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Nicolette Meister Curator of Collections, Logan Museum of Anthropology, Beloit, WI
John Molini Chief, Packing & Shipping, Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Glenna Nielsen Collections Manager, Natural History Museum of Utah,
Rio Tinto Center, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
Miriam Nelson Head of Preservation for the Ohio University Library in Athens, Ohio
Nancy Odegaard Objects Conservator, Arizona State Museum, Tucson, AZ
Skip Palenik Founder and Senior Research Microscopist, Microtrace, Elgin, IL
Peter Peregrine Professor of the Anthropology at Lawrence University in Appleton, WI
Gregg Perry Furniture and Clock Conservator, Owner of Perry Antique Conservation,  Topton, PA
Olivia Primanis Senior Book Conservator, Harry Ransom Center, Austin, TX
Sarah Reidell Associate Conservator for Rare Books and Paper, New York Public Library, New York, NY
Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler Chief of the NARA Document Conservation Laboratory, Washington, D.C.
Steven Rosengard Textile Preparator, Assistant Curator, Museum of Science & Industry Chicago; Fashion Designer, Cast member of Project Runway, Season 4
James Roth Deputy Director, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston, MA
Diane Robert Rousseau Conservator of Stained and Leaded Glass, Private Practice, North Adams, MA
John Russick Curator, Chicago History Museum, Chicago, IL
Susan Russick Book and Paper Conservator, Private Practice, Chicago, IL
Lyndsie S. Selwyn Senior Conservation Scientist, Canadian Conservation Institute
Laurence Siegler Electrical Engineer, Omaha, NE
Dr. Sheila Fairbrass Siegler Private Conservator, Omaha, NE, Summer Faculty, Conservation Science, University of Texas, Austin TX
Tim Stohl Owner of Quality Plastering, Colona, IL
Jennifer Hain Teper Conservation Librarian and Head of the Conservation Unit for the University Library at the U of I, Urbana-Champaign
Julie Unruh Archaeological conservator, Private Practice, Austin, TX
Robert Weiglein Exhibit Designer, The Field Museum, Chicago, IL
Walter WIlson Design and Installation Specialist, Krannert Art Museum, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL
Bob Yapp President, Preservation Resources, Inc., Hannibal, MO

Biographies

Gary Albright is a conservator of paper and photographs in private practice. He graduated from the Winterthur Museum/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation in 1978. From 1980 to 1999 he was senior paper and photograph conservator at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, Andover, MA. In 1999 he became conservator at the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY, where he taught treatment of photographs to the fellows in the Advanced Residency Program for Photograph Conservators. Since starting his own practice in 2003, Albright has been a visiting professor for the Art Conservation Departments at the State University of Buffalo and the University of Delaware. During his career he has treated a diverse array of objects, including the Emancipation Proclamation, a Honus Wagner baseball card, Ansel Adams’ photographs, and working drafts of the Constitution of the United States. Albright lives and works in Honeoye Falls, New York.

^back to top


Jonathan Appell is a gravestone conservator and monumental mason; who performs gravestone preservation training workshops and stone preservation projects throughout the United States.

Jonathan has studied violin & cabinet making, sculpture & mold making, and stone carving. He is an expert in rigging and lifting heavy objects, with well over 20 years experience in material handling. He is well versed in the history of masonry construction and it preservation, including historic mortars.

Currently Jonathan a trustee of the Association for Gravestone Studies, a member and demonstrator with the Preservation Trades Network, a member; of the Association for Preservation and Technology, The Stone Foundation, The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, the Carving Studio and Sculpture Center, and The National Trust for Historic Preservation.

www.gravestoneconservation.com

^back to top


David Arbogast is an architectural conservator with a private practice in Davenport, Iowa. After receiving his graduate degree in 1974 from Columbia University in architectural restoration he worked as an historical architect for the National Park Service in the Midwest Regional Office in Omaha, the Northeast Regional Office in Boston, and the Denver Service Center over a span of eight years. He then was employed by an architectural firm in Iowa City, Iowa, following which he has maintained a private practice first in Iowa City and now in Davenport. His specialties are paint and mortar analysis, although his practice encompasses the full spectrum of architectural conservation with projects ranging from state capitol buildings to log cabins and from Alaska to Florida.

^back to top


Hubert Baija is a Senior Conservator-Restorer at the Conservation Department of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he is responsible for the conservation of 7000 antique picture frames. After training in chemistry, mineralogy and biology, he studied educational sciences at the University of Amsterdam and completed his studies at the State Academy of Fine Arts in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, with internships at the Dutch Cultural Institute, Rome, Italy, at the National Gallery, London, England, and at the National Museum of Bayern, Munich, Germany.

Mr. Baija has consulted to museums and collectors on the conservation of gilded and polychrome objects. He teaches frame history and conservation at the University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and at the Metropolia University in Helsinki, Finland. He acted as an External Examiner for MA and Ph.D. students in conservation at the Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium and at the Royal College of Art, London, England. He is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) and has served as co-chair of the International Council of Museums, Conservation Committee (ICOM-CC) Wood, Furniture and Lacquer Working Group. He participated in the translation of Framing in the Golden Age by P.J.J. van Thiel and C.J. de Bruijn Kops into English. Hubert Baija has presented and published on historic gilding techniques, on the conservation of picture frames, on the framing of medieval panel paintings, and on the history of picture frames.

During thirty five years of dedication to the arts he also illustrated school books and taught drawing and painting.

back to top


Barbara A. Becker is an exhibit planner, label-writer, and evaluator who has worked in Chicago for nearly 30 years. She has been on staff at both the Field Museum and the John G. Shedd Aquarium, where she planned and wrote labels for many exhibitions both small and large, including the award-winning Amazon Rising. For the last four years, she has been independent, working with museums, parks, colleges, botanic gardens, and other nonprofit organizations on signage, displays, and evaluation. As a frequent associate of Serrell & Associates she has carried out summative evaluation studies at various local museums. Recently, she participated in the Excellent Judges program developing a framework to assess excellence in museum exhibitions. For three years, she has been a guest lecturer on exhibit development, label writing, and evaluation at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
www.cmegchicago.org

^back to top


Sharon Bennett has been the project archivist for the College of Charleston since 2007.  Prior to her current position she served as Archivist at The Charleston Museum where in addition to her curatorial and preservation duties, she was responsible for disaster planning and response for the Museum collections. Sharon received her B.A. from the College of Charleston and her M.L.S. from the University of South Carolina, Columbia. She has been a consultant for the Palmetto Archives, Libraries, and Museums Council (PALMCOP) and for the S.C. State Historical Records Advisory Board (SHRAB). A veteran of hurricane Hugo, she has taught and participated in numerous disaster preparedness and response workshops throughout the Southeast. On behalf of the Southeastern Museums Conference, Sharon taught the 1999 IMLS-funded two-day workshop "Hope for the Best, Prepare for the Worst," in South Carolina, Virginia, and Alabama and edited the 2000 SEMC Disaster Response Handbook. In 1999, she was the recipient of SEMC's Museum Leadership Award. Most recently she co-taught the NEH sponsored FAIC workshop "Safeguarding Our Cultural Heritage in Emergency Response," with Hilary A. Kaplan at Ft. Bragg, NC.

^back to top


James Bernstein, Conservator of Paintings & Mixed Media, is in private practice in San Francisco, California. He is a graduate of the High School of Music & Art (NYC), Brandeis University, and the Cooperstown Graduate Program in Conservation (now at Buffalo). Jim was Conservator and Co-Director of Conservation for the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art for 15 years, instrumental in the training of interns and the design of the museum's conservation programs. Known for his knowledge of artist materials, his inventive problem-solving, and his skillful treatment of hybrid modern art works, Jim is dedicated to conservation education and loves to share his knowledge with others. Regularly called upon to teach color and compensation techniques to conservators at advanced seminars [hosted by institutions such as the Getty Museum, Museum of Modern Art (NY), New York University's Conservation Center, the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies and now the AIC], Jim has lectured on inpainting, picture varnishes, dilemmas in the conservation of contemporary art, and "Studio Tips."

^back to top


Terry Birkett is Director of Collections at The Detroit Institute of Arts, an encyclopedic collection of art and artifacts from prehistory to contemporary art. He has over 20 years experience with working with collections in various capacities, including design, planning, and implementing storage plans, managing storage facilities, storage equipment design, computerized tracking and documentation, digital imaging, supervision of art handling teams, and coordination of construction and renovation of buildings and systems that affect art storage. He has presented at numerous conferences on collection care and storage design, including American Institute for Conservation, Association of Midwest Museums, and the American Association of Museums, and was a recipient of the Midwest Registrars Committee Travel Stipend Award. He is a trainer for the Michigan Museum Associations Collections Care Workshops, and is a consultant to other museums, private businesses and collections on art storage facility design and equipment, collection management and documentation. In addition, he is the Collection Manager for a major private collection, responsible for the care, display, cataloging, and documentation of the collection.
www.dia.org

^back to top

____________________________________________________________________________

Ryan Boatright is a contemporary artist/photographer, and former Research Scientist at the Image Permanence Institute in Rochester, NY.  He created the website www.graphicsatlas.org, an online resource that brings sophisticated print identification tools to conservators, archivists, curators, teachers, and the general public. Since leaving IPI in late 2009, Ryan has co-founded of the Atelier Boba, a photograph conservation lab and digital printing studio located in Paris France. He graduated with a degree in photography from Indiana University in 2005, and is currently making artwork that utilizes processes of his own design/manufacture. It can be seen at www.ryanboatright.com

back to top


Luke Boehnke is a part time instructor in the Sculpture department at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a full time employee of Methods and Materials—a Chicago based fine art rigging company specializing in both national and international large-scale problem solving for museums, private entities, and public organizations.

Luke Boehnke brings a hands-on knowledge of several construction practices applicable to rigging and installation.  He specializes in welding and metal fabrication for large-scale mounts and rigging apparatus.  In addition, he is a certified operator of several heavy machines including forklifts, articulated booms, and carry deck cranes.

Luke received his MFA from School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2006 ; his BFA in 2003 from Montana State University, Bozeman, MT

back to top

___________________________________________________________________________

Camille Myers Breeze began her textile conservation career in 1989 at the Textile Conservation Workshop in South Salem, New York. After earning a BA in Art History from Oberlin College, she received an MA in Museum Studies: Costume and Textiles Conservation from the Fashion Institute of Technology. She spent five years in the Textile Conservation Laboratory at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York City before moving to the Textile Conservation Center at the American Textile History Museum, in Lowell, Massachusetts. Camille founded Museum Textile Services in 1999 as a full-service textile conservation studio serving museums, historical societies, and private collectors. She is the author of numerous articles, a book on American tapestry conservation techniques, and has taught in the United States, the Dominican Republic, and Peru.

http://www.museumtextiles.com

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Dan Brinkmeier Through nearly 28 years of involvement at Chicago’s Field Museum, Dan Brinkmeier has worked in the fields of communication for rural development, museum exhibit design and production, and public outreach. An artist, educator, and instructional materials designer, Dan has served as a media trainer and advisor for numerous environmental conservation organizations, museums, and academic institutions in South America and Africa. Dan has a BFA in painting from the University of Illinois and an Ms.c (emphasis on development communication) from Iowa State University.

^back to top


William Budde is Project Archivist, Bennington Museum, Bennington, VT

detailed bio to come

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Christine Conniff-O'Shea studied drawing and printmaking at the University of New Mexico where she received her B. A. in Fine Arts. Luckily, she was able to find a job in a related field as an Assistant Conservator at the Art Institute of Chicago, a position she has held for over 20 years. Chris has worked on many of the museum's major exhibitions, the most recent being "Himalayas: An Aesthetic Adventure" and "Windows on the West: Chicago and the Art of the New Frontier." Chris specializes in historic and period mounting and framing of works of art on paper from the 14th through the 19th century.

^back to top


Christa Deacy-Quinn holds a M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Illinois and a B.A. in Anthropology and Museum Studies from SUNY-Oswego. She has been in the museum field for twenty years, and has served as the Collections Manager at the Spurlock Museum at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign since 1991. When the new Spurlock facility was constructed, she designed storage spaces and directed the packing and transport of the collection. She has designed and installed more than a dozen permanent exhibits and over thirty temporary museum exhibits.

She has developed and implemented an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system for the Spurlock. She is a strong advocate for low-chemical, low-cost IPM solutions. She has run preservation-focused workshops that address IPM and has consulted with numerous other institutions regarding developing or expanding IPM programs. She designed a number of databases in use at the Spurlock, including databases to track the condition of artifacts and museum pests. She is a Certified Technician for General Use Pesticides in Illinois.

She is active in the field of preservation, serving as a Peer Reviewer for the Museum Assessment Program for the American Association of Museums and is a member of the Preservation Working Group at the University of Illinois.

^back to top

Pat Eckhardt has been interested in art and architecture for most of her life. But it was not until she and her husband and children moved into an historic house in Iowa City in the 1970s that she became interested in historic preservation. She was encouraged by discovering and joining Friends of Historic Preservation of Iowa City, Inc., and later became its president. This group advocated preservation zoning for neighborhoods, promoted public education events and developed educational materials for children. 

Patricia completed three graduate degrees at the University of Iowa, an MA and PhD in art and architectural history and an MFA in arts management. She also worked for the Iowa State Historical Society Bureau of Historic Preservation as a preservation grants manager and as a developer of public programs. Since 1990 she has operated a private consulting business, Eckhardt Research, and has worked as an architectural historian and consultant throughout Iowa and neighboring states.  She has continued her scholarly interest in architectural history by presenting numerous papers at local and national conferences and has written articles, tour guides, historic context statements, and chapters in books about a variety of historical and architectural subjects.  

^back to top


Betsy Palmer Eldridge has over forty years of experience as a Book Conservator. In the '60's, she apprenticed as a bookbinder in Germany, studied book decoration in France, and worked in the conservation of book, manuscript and archival material in New York. She has had her own studio in Toronto since 1975 and has taught courses in bookbinding and conservation since 1984. She has been active in professional organizations both nationally and internationally.

^back to top


Linda Eppich is the former Archivist/Grant Writer of The Preservation Society of Newport County, Newport, RI, where she was employed for 7 ½ years.  As a development professional, she raised funds for special projects – historic preservation, object conservation, educational programs, exhibitions, landscape and tree maintenance and strategic planning.  As the first Archivist, she organized the institutional archives of the organization.  She is a grant reviewer for NEH and IMLS.  Before employment by PSNC, Ms. Eppich was a Curator at The Rhode Island Historical Society in Providence, RI for over 22 years.  At RIHS, she was responsible for exhibitions, collections care, conservation needs of a varied collection, grant writing for collections’ projects, and planning and writing of collections documents.  She is a member of AAM, AASLH, and is on the Board of the AAM Curators Committee (CurCom); she served as Chair of CurCom from 2005-2009.  Ms. Eppich has a BS in Interior Design from Ohio State University and a MS in Clothing and Textiles from Eastern Michigan University and has completed post graduate work in American History, Textile History and Conservation, and Archival Administration.  She has college teaching experience in higher education institutions in Michigan and Rhode Island.  Currently, Ms. Eppich completes projects for private textile clients, museum clients and writes grant proposals for several organization.

back to top


Hal Erickson Hal Erickson is a consulting conservation scientist/materials chemist/instructor in private practice out of Cora, Wyoming and is a full-time researcher specializing in cardiac stem cell therapies at University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, UT. Previously, Hal was a biophysical chemist specializing in conservation science at the University of Texas' Center for the Cultural Record, an “umbrella” center that includes the Preservation and Conservation Studies Program, where he taught the conservation science curriculum for twelve years. Erickson's special conservation science interests are in the areas of enzymes; mass deacidification; novel solvent techniques; the relationship between fiber morphology and lignocellulosic chemistry in the aging of paper, and digital feature extraction for the discovery of lost and obscured content in manuscripts, works of art on paper and bindings.

^back to top


Debra Evans is a conservator of prints and drawings at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where she has worked since 1983. Prior to that she was paper conservator at Pacific Regional Conservation Center at Bishop Museum in Honolulu. An undergraduate philosophy major, she received her graduate education at the Winterthur/University of Delaware Art Conservation Program. Debra is a past president of the Western Association for Art Conservation and a Fellow of the American Institute for Conservation. She has supervised numerous conservation program interns, and since 1986, has taught preventive conservation in the graduate program in Museum Studies at J.F.K. University. She has spoken on the subject of loss compensation at WAAC and is co-author of the BPG catalog section on "Filling of Losses." Since 1994, Debra has been co-instructor of the above-mentioned inpainting workshops with Jim Bernstein.

^back to top



Julia Fenn was born in South Africa and took her BA degree in Archaeology at the University of Cape Town before going to England to specialize in the conservation of anthropological material at London University. Since then she has worked for museums on three continents, including the British Museum, the South African Museum of Natural History, and the Royal Ontario Museum. She has experience in the identification and conservation of a wide range of materials, including modern plastics, which she has studied since 1985.

^back to top


Pam Gaible is the Mount Shop Supervisor at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. She has a Master of Fine Arts degree in Sculpture from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and has over 14 years experience designing and fabricating archival mounts at the Field Museum. She has worked closely with conservators, curators, exhibit developers, and designers to make mounts for a large variety of objects including: dinosaur fossils, Egyptian mummies, Pacific Island ceremonial objects, African textiles, Native American clothing, animal skeletons, and meteorites. Major exhibits at the Field Museum which Pam has worked on include "Kremlin Gold: 1000 Years of Russian Gems and Jewels," "Cleopatra of Egypt," "Cartier - 1900 to 1939," "Scrolls from the Dead Sea," "Sue" (the dinosaur), "Inside Ancient Egypt," "Traveling the Pacific," "Africa," "Life Over Time," and "What Is an Animal?"

^back to top


Joseph Gallagher Mr. Gallagher was born in Philadelphia but has lived all of his adult life in the west. His undergraduate degree was obtained at Temple University, while his graduate degrees were awarded at Idaho State University and Southern Methodist University. Mr. Gallagher was employed by the USDA-Forest Service until his recent retirement. During that time Mr. Gallagher worked with leading architectural conservationists in the restoration of numerous early 20th century cabins, barns, homes and offices. Since 1983, Mr. Gallagher has be the principal in Heritage Preservation Resources and has restored, repaired or assessed over 400 log and timber structures, most eligible for the National Register, many listed on the National Register and some listed as National Landmarks. Mr. Gallagher was a member of the National Trust’s Mississippi Valley flood assessment team; a Master Performer for the US Forest Service; an Instructor at Snow College in central Utah, and the recipient of numerous awards related to his conservation work. He has lead numerous field classes in historic building restoration and condition assessment through out the country. He is currently working with building owners in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Idaho. He remains a rabid Phillies fan. www.logdoc.com

^back to top



Michele Greenan serves as the Director of Archaeology for the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites (ISMHS).  In addition to traditional archaeological pursuits with a concentration on Midwestern Prehistory, Michele has gained over 15 years experience on a wide variety of field projects including mastodont recoveries, Pliocene/Miocene sinkhole excavations, and cave excavations. These varied projects have provided opportunities to consolidate bone and shell materials, treat organic wet collections, and conserve fragile, low-fired prehistoric ceramics. Michele is a graduate of Indiana State University and Ball State University.

back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Josh Hickman is the Digital Resources Librarian at Beloit College, where he oversees the creation and curatorship of digital collections consisting of holdings from the College archives and museums. Prior to his current position, Josh worked on digital projects at the Milwaukee Art Museum.  He holds a B.A. from Marquette University and received his Master of Library and Information Science degree from the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee.  In addition, Josh has served on the planning committee for the Upper Midwest CONTENTdm User Group Annual Meeting since the group’s inception in 2008.  Josh’s professional interests include the evolution of standards and best practices with regard to digitization and metadata for digital objects as well as the use of social media as a means of outreach and information exchange for cultural organizations.

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Mary Jablonski is an Architectural Conservator and President of the firm of Jablonski Building Conservation, Inc. and has more than 19 years experience in the field. She established the firm in 1995 to provide a full range of conservation services to a varied client base including architects and engineers, governmental agencies, institutions, religious properties, contractors, and homeowners. The type of work her firm performs includes masonry conservation; field testing and laboratory testing; construction supervision, as well as building and probe investigations and analysis.

Some of the varied masonry conservation projects have included, PS1 - The Contemporary Art Center in New York City, a dozen buildings at Yale University, numerous buildings at Columbia University, historic New York City Subway stations, Alster Tower on Heart Island in the St. Lawrence River, Franklin Hall in Philadelphia, as well as train stations, courthouses, and municipal buildings.

Mary is a graduate of the Columbia University Historic Preservation Program with an emphasis in Architectural Conservation and is an Adjunct Professor at Columbia University in the Historic Preservation Program. She is also a Professional Associate of AIC.
www.jbconservation.com

^back to top


Hilary A. Kaplan is Senior Conservator, National Archives and Records Administration in Washington, D.C. From 1989 - 2002 she was the Conservator at the Georgia Department of Archives and History. She is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation, serves as Secretary of the AIC Board, and advises the AIC Archives Project. Hilary holds a B.A. in music from Hunter College, an A.M. in musicology from The University of Chicago. She received her M.S. and Certificate in Library and Archives Conservation from Columbia University School of Library Service Conservation Education Program in 1987. Her interest in archives preservation has resulted in numerous publications, presentations, and assessments. She is Preservation Instructor for the Georgia Archives Institute (since 1988), and for the Archives Institute for Historically Black College and Universities (since 2000). Hilary has conducted workshops sponsored by the Society of American Archivists, the National Center for Preservation Technology and Training, the National Endowment for the Humanities, SOLINET, and AIC. This past October, she co-taught "Safeguarding Our Cultural Heritage in Emergency Response," with Sharon Bennett at Ft. Bragg, NC.

^back to top


Nathan Keay is the staff Photographer for the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, IL. He is also a professional photographer and artist. He is a graduate of the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, IL. www.nathankeay.com

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

David Kennedy is the Curator of Collections of the Cherokee Strip Regional Heritage Center in Enid, Oklahoma. His responsibilities have included developing collections storage plans, policies, and procedures; establishing environmental standards and related policies; planning and installation of temporary exhibits; and installing and creating various elements of the
permanent exhibit. Prior to his move to Oklahoma, Kennedy was the Curator of the Cody Firearms Museum of the Buffalo Bill Historical Center (2003-2009).Having received a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Texas at El Paso in 1998, Kennedy received his Master of Arts in History from Montana State University (MSU) in 2000. While at MSU, Kennedy served as Student Curator with the Museum of the Rockies exhibit, Weapons that Changed the West: From Flint to Fusion.


He is the author of Guns of the Wild West: A Photographic Tour of the Guns that Shaped our Country’s History and the content adviser for Katherine Brevard's The Story of Guns: How They Changed the World, a book on firearms for a middle school audience.


Mr. Kennedy believes that museums are a great educational equalizer and that the strength of museums lies in the collections they hold and protect. Kennedy was recently re-elected as a Board Member-at-Large for the Mountain-Plains Museums Association (MPMA) and serves on several committees within MPMA.

back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Gaby Kienitz is the Head Conservator at the Indiana State Museum (ISMHS). Principally specialized and accredited in textile conservation, she received additional training through internships in Native American ethnographic objects, as well as, archaeological ceramics and glass. She has worked in labs throughout Canada, the US and Turkey over the past 20 years. She graduated from the University of Alberta.

back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Cynthia Kuniej Berry is a painting conservator in private practice, Kuniej Berry Associates, Fine Art Conservation and Consulting in Chicago. Prior to going into private practice full-time, she was Associate Painting Conservator for Special Projects at the Art Institute of Chicago 2003- 2005 and Assistant Painting Conservator from 1998 to 2002 assigned to carry out technical examinations and treatments for the catalogue, 'European and Spanish Paintings Before 1600 in the Art Institute of Chicago.' Previously, she started a conservation studio at the Union League Club of Chicago, where she was their Painting Conservator from 1997 -1998. Cynthia founded a private practice, Fine Art Associates in 1994, which she ran until 1997. She worked as a Special Projects Conservator at the Art Institute on the catalogues, 'French and British Paintings from 1600-1800 in The Art Institute of Chicago' and 'Surrealist Art: the Lindy and Edwin Bergman Collection at the Art Institute of Chicago' from 1993-94. Cynthia was Associate Painting Conservator at the Rocky Mountain Regional Conservation Center in Denver from 1991-93. She held an Andrew Mellon Foundation Fellowship and a Graduate Internship in the Painting Conservation Department at the Art Institute of Chicago from 1987-1991. She did her graduate studies in Cooperstown and received a Master of Arts with a Certificate of Advanced Study in Conservation from the State University of New York, College at Buffalo in 1988. Cynthia has held internships at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, the Shelburne Museum in Vermont, the Indiana University Art Museum in Bloomington, Indiana, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art. She is a Professional Associate in the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, and also a member of the International Institute for Conservation, the Western Association for Art Conservators, the Midwest Regional Conservation Guild, and the Chicago Area Conservation Group. Cynthia has presented papers at professional conferences nationally and internationally; including The Conservation of Ancient Sites on the Silk Route in Dunhuang, China, sponsored by the Getty Conservation Institute.

^back to top


John Lambert is the Founder and President of Abstract Masonry Restoration, a 24-year-old historic masonry restoration contracting and consulting company located in Boston, Massachusetts, and Salt Lake City, Utah.  He has provided the historic masonry consulting and/or contracting services for several of America’s most notable masonry buildings and estimated/supervised over 1300 successful masonry restoration projects.  Additionally, he provides historic masonry expert witness and litigation support services. 

 Heavily involved in hands-on training for those interested in learning how to properly care for historic brick, stone, terra cotta and adobe structures, John has conducted hands-on historic masonry workshops at The Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies for over 12 years.  He strongly advocates broadening his students’ appreciation for historic masonry by organizing and leading annual trips to such locations as England/Wales, the Caribbean, and various lighthouses.  He has studied and trained in England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, France, Italy and Mexico.   John is a frequent speaker/trainer at historic preservation conferences and workshops sponsored by the Association for Preservation Technology (APT), Traditional Building, and other national and local historic preservation organizations. In addition to serving on several historic preservation-related boards, his historic preservation leadership includes chairing the Board of the Traditional Building Skills Institute at Snow College in Ephraim, Utah, as well as serving on ASTM Subcommittee C12.03.03, the task group charged with developing new standards for restoration mortars, and the ASTM task group charged with updating and reinstating the ASTM standard for Natural Cement.  He was chosen as the historic masonry expert for the television production THIS OLD HOUSE for a project in East Boston, MA.  In 2007, John was honored with the Lucybeth Rampton Award, presented to individuals who have demonstrated a lifetime commitment to historic preservation and whose vision and activities have significantly impacted the preservation movement.  John is a passionate collector of rare and historic books, art and documents written about masonry materials and practices during the 1700’s to early 1900’s.  An avid student of these valuable resources, he has gained unique insight into the minds of the architects, engineers and craftsmen of the time.  He is an expert on the evolution of early American unit masonry mortars. 

In his spare time, John enjoys raising prime organic beef cows, enjoying his 1-year-old twin grandsons, and playing competitive basketball.

www.masonry-restoration.com

^back to top


Gary J. Laughlin, PhD is currently Senior Research Microscopist and Instructor at McCrone Research Institute (McRI) in Chicago where, since 1987, he has taught over 250 one-week courses in various kinds of microscopy to over 3500 students. In addition, he is Adjunct Professor at the University of Illinois in the Forensic Science Program and is Visiting Professor at Cornell University where he teaches chemical microscopy for the Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Human Ecology, Textiles and Apparel, and the Cornell Architectural Conservation Group. He currently serves as President and Executive Director on the Board of McCrone Research Institute, is a Life Member and former President of the State Microscopical Society of Illinois, is a Fellow in the Royal Microscopical Society, and is a Member of the American Chemical Society and the American Institute for Conservation. Dr. Laughlin received degrees in Criminalistics (Forensic Science) and Chemistry from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a Ph.D. in Metallurgical and Materials Engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). His doctoral thesis used microscopy and microanalysis to explore archaeological evidence for Early Bronze Age tin-ore processing in ancient Anatolia.
www.mcri.org

^back to top


John Leeke is an historic building specialist who helps owners,tradespeople, contractors and architects understand and maintain historic buildings. He has been restoring historic buildings for over 40 years and still spends a good part of his time "with hammer in hand." A well-recognized preservation craftsman, John has emerged in the past quarter-century as a popularizer of building conservation principles writing for national preservation journals and consumer publications and through a series of technical publications of his own. John has gained a substantial reputation as an advocate of conservation planning and maintenance programming consulting on preservation projects nationally. He has lead and taught more than 100 workshops and training sessions demonstrating leadership skills, craft knowledge, and practical management abilities.John's motto: by hammer and hand great works do stand by mind and heart we share the art .

back to top


Earl Lock is an Exhibit Designer and Fabricator in private practice in Chicago with over 15 years experience designing and fabricating exhibit components for natural history museums, art galleries, and children's museums. He holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. He has worked on major exhibits at the Field Museum of Natural History, The Art Institute of Chicago, The Adler Planetarium, The DuPage Children's Museum, The Lincoln Museum in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and The Speed Art Museum in Louisville, Kentucky. One of his most recently completed projects is the design and fabrication of archival mounts for the reinstallation of the Asian, African, and European collections in the recently renovated Milwaukee Art Museum.

^back to top


Peggy McNamara is an Adjunct Associate Professor, Visual Communication Design at the School of the Art Institute, Chicago.  She is also Research Associate in Zoology and Artist in Residence, Field Museum, Chicago. Adjunct Associate Professor, Visual Communication Design (1996). Peggy received a BA in art history in 1969 from Manhattanville College in New York; and an MA in art history in 1970 from the University of Chicago. Her publications include Painting Wildlife in Watercolor; Illinois Insects and Spiders; Architecture by Birds and Insects.

back to top

___________________________________________________________________________

William Maher is University Archivist and Professor of Library Administration at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He was Assistant University Archivist at UIUC (1977-85 & 1985-95), and Program Officer at the U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities (1985-86). He was President (1997-88) and Treasurer (1991-94) of the Society of American Archivists; and President (1987-89) and Secretary-Treasurer (1981-85) of the Midwest Archives Conference.

He holds degrees from Case Western Reserve University (1972), Washington University (1975), and UIUC (1991). As the author of one book and over 20 articles, he is a regular speaker on archival administration and copyright law.

back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Harold F. Mailand holds a Master's degree in Textile Design and Education from Indiana University. His training in textile conservation includes internships at The Textile Museum, Smithsonian Institution, Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, and The Costume Institute/Metropolitan Museum of Art with grants from National Endowment for the Arts, National Museum Act, and others. Mr. Mailand was Associate Textile Conservator for the Indianapolis Museum of Art, and in 1986, he founded Textile Conservation Services, a textile conservation facility in Indianapolis, Indiana. He is a Fellow in American Institute for Conservation (AIC). His most recent publication is a 1999, co-authored, 92-page text entitled "Preserving Textiles: A Guide for the Nonspecialist."
www.textileconservation.com

^back to top


Susan Maltby received a Masters in Art Conservatin from Queen's University. After graduation, she worked in the Ethnology Laboratory at the Canadian Conservation Institute for four years. In 1989, she established her own conservation consulting firm. As a consultant, she provides both private and public sector clients with training seminars; collection surveys; advice on collections care and management; and conservation guidelines for exhibits, museums, and heritage structures. In addition to teaching at the Campbell Center, she teaches a graduate seminar in the Museum Studies Program at the University of Toronto and has taught in the Art Conservation Program at Queen's University. Susan writes a monthly numismatic conservation column - "Preserving Collectibles" - for Coin World, is a regular contributor to Scott's Stamp Monthly, and has written for Old House Journal.

^back to top


Nicolette Meister is the Curator of Collections of the Logan Museum of Anthropology at Beloit College. She also serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor in Beloit College’s Museum Studies Program and has taught Introduction to Collections Management and Introduction to Museum Studies. Prior to her arrival at Beloit in 1999 she worked at the Denver Art Museum and University of Colorado Museum of Natural History while she completed her M.S. in Museum and Field Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Previous museum experience also includes the Milwaukee Public Museum and the Pitt Rivers Museum at Oxford University, Oxford, England. She holds a B.A. in anthropology from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Nicolette has written and received grants from NEH and IMLS and has served as a grants reviewer for NEH.

^back to top


Renate Mesmer is the Assistant Head of Conservation at the Folger Shakespeare Library and the former Director of the Book and Paper Conservation Program at the Centro del bel Libro in Ascona, Switzerland. She has a Masters in bookbinding from the Chamber of Crafts of Palatinate in Germany and gained experience in conservation during ten
years of work as head of the conservation department at the Speyer's State Archives in Germany.

back to top

___________________________________________________________________________

John Molini, a recognized leader in the field of packing and transport, and a lively teacher and lecturer to boot, has been at the Art Institute since 1984. Originally hired as an art installer, after spending the late Seventies and early Eighties playing and touring in various Rock and R&B outfits, John set up and started the Art Packing Department in 1986 as the Art Institute became more active in lending, borrowing, and mounting exhibitions. Working with Museum Registration, John has been involved with the transport, packing, crating, and in some cases where rigging is a necessity, the installation of exhibitions whether at the "Tute" or on the road. Some of John's proudest accomplishments are: the design and construction of a safe packing system for the transport of pastels; the "hybrid": a design that incorporates corrugated plastic and cardboard with wood, producing a crate that though lighter than the standard all wooden crate, does not sacrifice or compromise protection; his tenure as Program Director and then Chairman of Pacin; the establishment of an Intern Program with the School of the Art Institute; and last, but certainly not least, teaching at the Campbell Center: where the accommodations can't be beat (hello, third floor), the meals are always a treat (thank you, Nancy) and the students, bless them, keep him on his feet.

^back to top


Glenna Nielsen

Bio to come

back to top

____________________________________________________________________________

Miriam Nelson has a background in Art History, Cultural Memory and Library Science from the University of New Mexico, the University of London, and Indiana University where she specialized in Rare Books and Fine Arts Librarianship. She is the Head of Preservation for the Ohio University Library in Athens, Ohio.  She was employed at the E. Lingle Craig Preservation Lab from 2006 to 2012 where she worked under Garry Harrison in circulating collections conservation. Miriam is particularly interested in the care of special collections that fall outside of the purview of the rare book library, as well as the best practice for collection maintenance to insure the preservation of items of artefactual value. She attended the Book and Paper Intensive in 2008, taught a workshop on library collection maintenance and repair at DePauw in University in 2009, and recently organized a professional development workshop in leather repair by Don Etherington for the IUB conservation staff.

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Nancy Odegaard is the Conservator at the Arizona State Museum and Associate Research Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Arizona, Tucson. She is a Fellow of the AIC and IIC. She holds a PHD in Applied Science through the Conservation and Cultural Heritage Science Studies Department of the University of Canberra, Australia. She studied conservation and earned a MA degree in Museum Studies/Anthropology at the George Washington University with a Certificate in Ethnographic and Archaeological Conservation from the Smithsonian Institution. Her B.A. degree included major study in Art History, Fine Arts, Biology, and French Language. Her experience in conservation has been shaped by opportunities at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Museo Ixchel-Guatemala, the National Museum of Natural History, Mario's Conservation Services, the Peabody Museum-Harvard University, the Canadian Conservation Institute, and archaeological field work in Cyprus, Italy, Brazil, and Arizona. She was recently awarded a Kress Publication Fellowship to prepare the Materials Characterization directory for publication.

^back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Skip Palenik has had a lifelong fascination with the microscope that started when he received his first instrument at the age of eight.  Since then he has devoted himself to increasing his knowledge of analytical microscopy and microchemistry and applying it to the solution of real world problems, especially those of forensic interest.  He was fortunate in having worked closely with his mentor, Dr. Walter McCrone, for thirty five years and to have studied forensic microscopy with Dr. Max Frei-Sulzer of Zurich, a disciple of Dr. Edmond Locard of Lyon. 

Skip has been teaching analytical microscopy to forensic scientists for more than thirty years and has published numerous scientific articles and book chapters on the applications of chemical and forensic microscopy.  His most recent contribution is a chapter on the use of heavy minerals in forensic science.  He has also played a significant role in numerous criminal investigations including the Atlanta Child Murders, the Air India Bombing, Jon Benet Ramsey case, Narita Airport bombing (Tokyo), Hillside Strangler (LA), Oklahoma City bombing, Ivan the Terrible (Jerusalem), Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King (reinvestigation by U.S. House Select Committee on Assassinations), Unabomber, the disappearance of Helen Brach, The “Kiki” Camarena Murder Case and the Green River Serial Murders. 

He established Microtrace in 1992 to provide a resource for organizations and individuals in need of scientific services involving the analysis of microscopic trace evidence.  His special research interests are the identification of single small particles, small amounts of complete unknowns and tracing dust and soil back to their origins.

www.microtracescientific.com

back to top

____________________________________________________________________________

Peter N. Peregrine came to anthropology after completing an undergraduate degree in English. He found anthropology's social scientific approach to understanding humans more appealing than the humanistic approach he had learned as an English major. He undertook an ethnohistorical study of the relationship between Jesuit missionaries and Native American peoples for his master's degree and realized that he needed to study archaeology to understand the cultural interactions experienced by Native Americans prior to contact with the Jesuits.

 While working on his Ph.D. at Purdue University, Peter Peregrine did research on the prehistoric Mississippian cultures of the eastern United States. He found that interactions between groups were common and had been shaping Native American cultures for centuries. Native Americans approached contact with the Jesuits simply as another in a long string of intercultural exchanges. He also found that relatively little research had been done on Native American interactions and decided that comparative research was a good place to begin examining the topic. He has since done fieldwork in England and Syria, and museum work in Kenya, China, and Japan exploring the impact cross-cultural interactions have on the peoples involved. He has also conducted numerous cross-cultural studies using ethnographic materials. 

Peter Peregrine is currently professor of the anthropology at Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisconsin. He serves as research associate for the Human Relations Area Files at Yale University, and is president of the Society for Anthropological Sciences. He continues to do archaeological research, and to teach anthropology and archaeology to undergraduate students.

back to top

____________________________________________________________________________

Gregg Perry first started learning traditional furniture making in an apprenticeship during high school. He went on to earn a B.S. in Pre-Med and an M.S. in Microbiology and Food Science.  He returned to furniture making and restoration in 1987 when he began designing and building prototypes for high-end furniture manufacturers. In 1990 he founded his own company building high-quality, authentic 18th century reproduction Chippendale furniture. He now owns Perry Antique Conservation, a studio that offers conservation of furniture, wooden objects, clocks and watches, as well as consultation and authentication. He is also a certified appraiser. He served as an adjunct professor at NYU in 2008-2009, teaching courses on wood identification, clock identification and furniture connoisseurship.

Mr. Perry received a certificate in Conservation and Restoration of Furniture from The École Boulle/Louvre in Paris, France; certificates in Clock Conservation from the British Horological Institute in England and the NAWCC in Columbia, PA; and a certificate in appraisal at NYU.  He has also attended conservation workshops at West Dean College in Chichester, UK and the Campbell Center for Historic Preservation Studies in Mount Carroll, IL, and studied gilded surfaces and fresco conservation in Florence and Venice, Italy.

back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Olivia Primanis began her training with Jean Gunner at Hunt Institute, Pittsburgh, PA through an informal apprenticeship in hand book binding and book conservation.  Concurrently she opened "The Bookbinder" (1976-1984), which offered artists' supplies and bookbinding services for individuals and institutions.  In 1984 she moved to Los Angeles, CA and continued her private practice of conservation bookbinding and teaching.  Since 1990, Ms Primanis has held the position of Senior Conservator at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, Austin, TX, and performs conservation treatments, teaches, and participates in departmental administration. She lectures and presents classes on general conservation and preservation subjects relating to libraries and museums materials as well specific topics such as disaster recovery, mold,  minimally invasive book repairs and 19th century photo album history and structure.

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Sarah Reidell Sarah Reidell has an MLIS/CAS in Conservation and Preservation of Library and Archival Materials from the University of Texas and an AB in Anthropology from Bryn Mawr College.  In 2006 she joined The New York Public Library as Associate Conservator for Rare Books and Paper after previous appointments as Conservator for Special Collections in Harvard University Library’s Weissman Preservation Center and Andrew W. Mellon Advanced Fellow at the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) in Philadelphia. Sarah is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) and recently served as the AIC Book and Paper Group Program Chair (2012-2013). Her interest in working with pre-coated materials is a result of her experience working on digitization and grant-funded projects of single-item and batch treatments of special collections materials that required high-output and efficiency.

back to top

________________________________________________________________________

Mary Lynn Ritzenthaler has been chief of the NARA document conservation laboratory Washington, D.C. since 1985. She has written extensively on archives preservation topics and participated in the Charters of Freedom preservation project. Mary Lynn went to Baghdad, Iraq where she was on an assignment to salvage archival materials documenting the Iraqi Jewish community that were severely damaged during the recent hostilities. Previously she worked for the Society of American Archivists and the University of Illinois at Chicago and studied bookbinding for many years in Chicago.

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Steven Rosengard works as the Museum of Science and Industry’s assistant curator and textile preparator. Steven has been working with mannequins for a number of years, mastering the technique of custom mannequin making. His job includes carving and propping out the museum’s exhibits.  Steven has been featured in several fashion news segments and is part of the season four cast of Bravo’s show, Project Runway. Also a successful fashion designer, Steven designs everything from day dresses to wedding gowns for his clients.

www.stevenrosengard.com

^back to top


Diane Roberts Rousseau began working professionally with stained glass in 1987, shortly after taking her Bachelor of Arts from Washington University and the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. She returned to England to take up a postgraduate course in Stained Glass Studies at the Vauxhall College of Applied Arts. Her training there, under Sally Botha, included seminar trips to the cathedral studios at Canterbury and York. Her decision to combine formal study with a traditional apprenticeship brought her from England to the Botti Studio of Architectural Arts in Chicago. In 1993, she joined Cummings Studios, North Adams, MA, in order to focus on conservation. She is now the senior member of the group. Recent training includes Steven Koob’s course in conservation of three-dimensional glass objects and C.V. Horie’s “Chemistry for Conservators” via International Academic Projects. Her published work can be found in Stained Glass Quarterly and Glass Artist magazine. She has spoken on L.C. Tiffany at the Rensselaer County Historical Society endowed lecture series, as well as other venues. Her current research is concentrated on French medieval glass in the museum environment.

^back to top


James Roth is Head of the Archival Processing Unit at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum.  Part of his duties include overseeing the arrangement and description of collections, including the reduction of the backlog of unprocessed collections; the editing and conversion of oral history transcripts; and managing the scanning and creation of metadata for digital collections.  He received a BA in History from Johnson State College in 1995, completed a MA in American History from the University of New Hampshire in 1999, and an MSLS, specializing in Archives, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2000.

 He has published articles, given presentations, and taught classes and workshops.  He is a past recipient of the Theodore Calvin Pease Award (2001), and has published articles in American Archivist, Prologue, and The Hemingway Review.  James has covered the fundamentals of a wide range of archival activities including appraisal, acquisitions, arrangement, description, reference, and access. As an Adjunct Faculty member at Simmons College (2007), he taught LIS 438-Introduction to Archival Methods and Services. He has taught basic archives workshops for New England Archivists (2006) and the New Hampshire Archives Group (2005). James has served SAA in a variety of capacities as member, then chair (2005), of the Colonial Dames of America and Donna Cutts Scholarship Committee (2003-2005); Key Contact for Eastern Massachusetts (2003-2005) and District 1 Representative for the Membership Committee (2005-2007); Vice Chair/Chair of the Membership Committee (2007-2009); Vice Chair/Chair of the Description Section (2007-2008); and has served on the Dues Increase Communications Plan Task Force (2007-2008). He also is involved with the New England Archivists, and is currently a member of the Education Committee (2001-2007). 

When he is not singing and dancing on tables to amuse his colleagues and interns at work, James loves spending all his free time with his two daughters and wife, going to the park, singing lullabies, hoping against hope that the kids will go down at a reasonable hour.

back to top


John Russick has twenty years of exhibition experience in a variety of museums including the Field Museum of Natural History and the National Museum of American History. Since coming to the Chicago History Museum in 1998, he has led the development of eight major exhibitions. Most recently, he served as the lead curator for Mapping Chicago: The Past and the Possible (2007). He was also lead curator for Sensing Chicago (2006), which received an honorable mention at the 19th Annual Excellence in Exhibition national competition. John has won awards for both his preservation work and his exhibit label writing and he serves on the board of the Curators’ Committee of the American Association of Museums.

^back to top


Susan Russick is a Special Collections Conservator at Northwestern University Library.  She is a Professional Associate member of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works and holds a MLIS with a Certificate of Advanced Study in Conservation from the University of Texas at Austin.  Her 20 years of conservation experience include positions at the Newberry Library, the Library of Congress, the National Museum of American History, the National Museum of Natural History, and Nishio Conservation.

^back to top


Lyndsie S. Selwyn Ms. Selwyn graduated in 1985 from the University of California at San Diego with a PhD in physical chemistry, followed by post-doctoral research at the National Research Council of Canada in Ottawa. In 1987 she joined the Canadian Conservation Institute and is presently a senior conservation scientist. Her research focuses on corrosion and conservation problems associated with metals.

^back to top


Laurence Siegler received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering in 1973.  He has worked as an engineer making digital electronic organs and automated guided vehicle systems.  He eventually became a software engineer, developing software for scientific lab instruments for the pharmaceutical industry.  He has had a successful consulting business and is now retired, pursuing a Master’s degree in Horn Performance. He became  interested in building lab equipment to help his wife, a paper conservator, build a home conservation lab.

back to top

_____________________________________________________________________________

Dr. Sheila Fairbrass Siegler has a first degree in Chemistry and a Ph.D in Chemical Engineering from Imperial College London. She is a Member Royal Society of Chemistry, a Chartered Scientist, a Fellow of the IIC, and a Professional Associate of the AIC. She trained as a paper conservator at Camberwell College, London, graduating in 1972. Sheila is an Accredited Paper Conservator in Europe. Before moving to America, she worked for 10 years in the conservation department at the Tate Gallery, London and subsequently worked as a free-lance paper conservator for several major museums and government institutions. She was the Head of Paper Conservation at the Nebraska State Historical Society Gerald R. Ford Conservation Center from 2005-2007 and is now a free-lance conservator, lecturer and writer, living in Omaha Nebraska. She is summer faculty at the University of Texas at Austin where she teaches Conservation Science to the students on the conservation course at The Kilgarlin Center for Preservation of the Cultural Record.

^back to top


Tim Stohl is Owner of Quality Plastering, Colona, IL

detailed bio to come

^back to top


Jennifer Hain Teper has served since 2001 as the Conservation Librarian and Head of the Conservation Unit for the University Library at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she oversees general and special collections conservation.  A 2000 graduate of the University of Texas at Austin program, she has worked extensively with scrapbook
collections at the University of Illinois, overseeing a conservation need survey of over 500 historic scrapbooks and the treatment or stabilization of 169 of those items.  She has written and presented multiple times on scrapbooks and their preservation.

back to top

__________________________________________________________________________

Julie Unruh has twenty years of experience as an art and archaeological conservator.  She holds a graduate degree in Art Conservation from Queen's University, Canada, and has worked in the conservation departments of museums including the Smithsonian Institution, The National Gallery of Art, The Royal Ontario Museum, The Fitzwilliam Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, and The American Museum of Natural History. Her experience includes archaeological conservation projects in the United States and abroad, including projects in Greece, Turkey, Algeria, Afghanistan, Antarctica, and Iraq. Julie now operates her own private art conservation practice.

back to top

______________________________________________________________________________

Robert Weiglein is an Exhibit Designer at The Field Museum in Chicago, IL

Bio to come

^back to top


Walter Wilson is a Design and Installation Specialist at the Krannert Art Museum of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL. He has over twenty years’ experience installing art and artifacts in public institutions and private collections in Chicago and throughout the Midwest.  He enjoys every phase of the installation process from the initial discussions and sketches to material, safety and design issues. Walter began his career as an installer with Terry Dowd, Inc. while still an art student. He went on to positions as Operations Manager at The Icon Group and Production Manager at the Chicago Botanic Garden before joining the Krannert Art Museum in 2007.

Walter has taught at the Riverside Arts Center in Riverside, Illinois and worked in Chicago Public Schools as a visiting artist with the Chicago Neighborhood Artists Program. He received his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, specializing in sculpture, foundry and drawing. He was born and raised in Dallas, Texas.

 

back to top

____________________________________________________________________________

Bob Yapp has dedicated his career to community planning, historic preservation and central city revitalization. He's been involved in the restoration or renovation of over 150 historic properties. In 1996 Bob produced and hosted the national, PBS series, About Your House with Bob Yapp. The 52 show series was co-underwritten by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. He wrote his first book, About Your House in 1997 and is working on his second. Bob was raised in Des Moines, Iowa where he was a furniture maker, old house rehabber, Des Moines Register columnist and syndicated radio talk show host. Today, Bob is President of Preservation Resources, Inc. based in Hannibal, Missouri where he recently founded a new school for teaching hands-on preservation skills called the Belvedere School for Hands-On Preservation.

^back to top